“BACK TO THE BLACK” AT #29 IN KINDLE STORE

A week ago I announced the Kindle launch of my book “Back to the Black: how to become debt-free and stay that way”, at a promotional price of £0.70 including VAT.

 

(That promo price, by the way, is also being applied to the other e-formats already available in the Smashwords Store.)

 

Today, I was pleased to see that, within the “Personal Finance” category of the Kindle Store, my book is now ranked at #29 out of 3,902 titles. The ranking is “sorted by best-selling”, according to Amazon.

 

Many thanks, therefore, to those of you who have bought a copy and helped put it at #29!

 

 

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

“Back to the Black: how to become debt-free and stay that way”, is available on the following retail sites:

Kindle Store: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004PLMAQM

Smashwords store for other e-formats, including .pdf: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/22886

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You can follow me on Twitter: @michaelmac43, or Facebook: Michael James MacMahon.

INTRODUCTORY OFFER FOR KINDLE VERSION OF “BACK TO THE BLACK”

As I write, the experts are dissecting on TV the impact of the Budget just unveiled by UK Chancellor George Osborne. I don’t claim sufficient expertise to add to the acres of coverage it will already be getting. What I do know, though, is that the uncertainties in the economy have already led more and more people into debt.

As I have just uploaded my dealing-with-debt book to the kindle store, and as I feel sure that thousands of people could benefit from it, I want to ensure it gets into the hands of as many of them as possible. I don’t want the price of the book to be a barrier.

For an introductory period, therefore, the kindle version of “Back to the Black: how to become debt-free and stay that way” is available at a launch price of £0.70 (or $0.99 plus VAT). Go to http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004PLMAQM

For the sake of consistency, this promotional price also applies with immediate effect to the multi-format versions, including .pdf, that were already available in the Smashwords store (http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/22886). The price adjustments in both stores are already active.

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

Reading eBooks on other devices

You don’t need a kindle to read kindle-format books! If that doesn’t make sense, what I mean is that if you read eBooks but don’t have a kindle, there is a neat piece of (free!) software called “kindle for PC”, enabling one to benefit from the improved readability of the kindle technology (and it really is) when reading on a PC or any other device. There is also a Mac version.

For a download link, just type “kindle reading apps” into Google.

Book links

To sample or purchase “Back to the Black: how to become debt-free and stay that way”, go to on of the following retail sites:

kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004PLMAQM

Other e-formats, including .pdf: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/22886

Note: unlike physical books, eBooks carry VAT (I don’t understand the reason for the difference). The price in dollars is thus $1.14 to include VAT, i.e. British sales tax, even if the book is bought via www.amazon.com . In sterling the £0.70 price includes VAT.

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You can follow me on Twitter: @michaelmac43, or Facebook: Michael James MacMahon.



BAD NEWS SELLS PAPERS: BUT RADIO PROGRAMMES TOO?

Please indulge me, dear reader, if I take a short canter on one of my favourite hobby-horses. We all know that the thing that best sells newspapers (after sex) is bad news. I once listened to a media consultant speaking at a conference here in Bristol, saying: “News is what somebody, somewhere, doesn’t want you to know. Everything else is advertising.”

OK, so newspapers have to be bought or the publisher will go bust. (alongside “bought”, you can now include subscribing to a website pay-wall, in the case of the Times group of papers). If we complain, as I often do, about the relentless sensationalism of which our media is so fond, the remedy is in our own hands: don’t buy that particular paper.

What really gets my goat (Why “goat”? Answers please!) is when the same policy is adopted by the BBC, which, the last time I checked, is funded by licence fees.

The thing that got me going was just a snippet and I am not even 100% sure of the motivation of the presenter in this case … but I can make an educated guess. The subject was, I think, the London Olympics.

Presenter: “what do you think of these recent rule changes?”

Interviewee: “I am sure that the people who are responsible for those rules have made the changes for a good reason, so it’s up to us to get on with it.”

Presenter: “That’s a very diplomatic answer.”

(Presenter’s thought-bubble: “Rats! No controversy? Very disappointing answer.”)

OK, the presenter’s actual response to the answer was spoken softly, in the very polite voice that particular presenter always uses for her most penetrating questions. I could be adding two and two and making 57 … but I doubt it.